Gardening: Learning at Home with Children

This week marks National Gardening Week, the biggest annual celebration of gardening from Monday 27th April until Sunday 3rd May this year, 2020. Whatever the weather and even if you don’t have a garden you can still get children enjoying gardening. Young children love getting involved in the practical side of gardening. But also love as understanding how and why things happen. If you have an inquisitive little one there’s some lovely books to help you with their questions – you find them in our dedicated Gardening Week section on the website here.

Gardening – What We Eat

It’s a valuable skill to learn and have an understanding of the life cycle of plants. Knowing where our food comes from and what it takes to nurture and support its growth gives children a bigger appreciation of the food that they eat. Children who get involved in growing their own fruits and vegetables are often more likely to try these and other new foods.

Children love taking on responsibility. Tending to a plant and ensuring it has everything it needs to grow is an incredibly rewarding pastime. My daughter has been checking her bean plant daily. She likes to ensure it’s in a warm, sunny spot and always reminds me daily that we need to water it – it’s a good job she does! Beans have not been something she’s wanted to try eating. However, at the weekend, she actually tried a French bean as she wanted to see how her bean might taste when it’s fully grown!

Home Learning Garden Ideas

Are you looking for home learning opportunities for maths and literacy? Then growing can be a great way to incorporate these skills in a contextual way. Young children to keep a bean diary documenting either in pictures and/ or words and sentences the growth of the bean. Introducing new vocabulary to them such as root, leaf, stem, shoot etc. incorporates science too. To bring in a little maths you could count how many leaves are on a stem each day. How many more was that than yesterday? You could use blocks or a ruler to measure your plant and track its progress. Learning can very much be active and should definitely be fun.

Growth to children is like magic; especially if you choose the right sort of plants. You can quickly see the impact of your dedication and care. Planting a mixture of plants that will grow at different rates is very useful. This mixture of faster and longer growing times help to keep children interested and involved.

No Garden?

There’s an ever increasing range on the site of child friendly gardening tools, plants, and other resources. All designed to explore the world of the garden through real experiences or play. Even if your ‘garden’ is a pot on your kitchen window you can still enjoy the pleasure of growing with your child. Check out the range here.

Creating Memories

One way to keep the memories of your garden alive is to take clippings and press them. As a child I would press flowers and then make them into bookmarks for friends and family. A lovely creative little craft. You could make leaf and flower collages or check out our arts and crafts range and get journalling your gardening efforts together.

Please do come and join our friendly Yes Bebe Babble group on Facebook. We’d love to see what gardening you’ve been up to with your little ones.

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